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The Needdo Youth Exchange is getting ready

 

The Needdo Youth Exchange, a project financed by Erasmus +, fosters social innovation among european youth, between 17 and 25 years old. The main activity of the project is a Youth Exchange in which will participate 40 youngsters from Spain and Slovakia. The mobility will take place in Bratislava during 15 days on July 2016.


During the mobility the youngs will participate in different activities such as workshops, discussion forums, interculturality and volunteering activities as well as pre-departure activities.The project is focus on how the young people could change the society through their participation on volunteering and social innovation activities.

The commitment in this kind of activities develops soft skills among participants, that will improve their employability and become more active citizens. All the activities has been developed by the partner organization and considering the participant’s proposals.

Furthermore, the cohabitation during the mobility will help to discover the diferent sensibilities of young people from diferent countries, and the several ways to live and to relate with others as well as their beliefs and costums.

In other words,

 we want to awake the entrepreneurial spirit of the european youth”.

 

By icnet

Monkole hospital, in Kinshasa, a benchmark in Medicine for Africa

Sometimes there are situations so serious, so difficult, that it seems they cannnot be changed. And that is the reason why they don’t improve. Because nobody goes for it. But that is precisely what the promoters of this project didn´t do. A hospital in a country –Democratic Republic of Congo– in the heart of Africa, with a population of 70 million inhabitants, where life expectancy is 48 years, the illiteracy rate is around 35%, that is still emerging from a war that lasted more than 25 years, and, until recently, in the last position of the UNDP’s Human Development Index.

The hospital centre, Monkole, started in Kinshasa city, where there are 9 million people, in a neighborhood where the unemployment rate reaches 82%, and 70% of the patients are poor. It opened its doors in 1991, having only three beds and an operating room, where they tried to assist every patient that arrived there. Now, it has 110 beds and is open 24 hours a day, with Obstetrics and Gynecology, Surgery, Pediatrics and Internal Medicine consultation service.

To bring health care to more remote areas, the doctors attend patients in three centres placed in the slums, far from the hospital: Kimbondo, Eliba and Moluka medical dispensaries. Also the ISSI nursing school and the CEFA professional training centre for doctors depend from Monkole Hospital.

More than 80.000 people per year are assisted in the hospital. The rate of occupation is higher than 90%. More than 300 people have found a job there, 98’5% of them are Congolese. And, what is more important, a reduction in mortality rate, from 4 to 2.4%, has been achieved in nine years: from 2004 to 2013.

This hospital is the main project supported by the ngo ONAY (Organización Navarra para Ayuda entre los Pueblos), which is one of the members of IcNet: the international network for youth and promotion of voluntary work founded in 1993 by Cooperación Internacional ONG, and composed of more than 20 organizations.

Among the projects of Monkole there is one than stands out: “Maternity without risks”, that, in three years, has surpassed the goal of helping 9.000 women that was set for it.

But, apart from medical assistance, the hospital is the first one in Kinshasa that, among its services, provides food for its patients, gives them clean bed linen, and facilitates personal hygiene. In fact, in Monkole –which is the name of an evergreen tree from the Congolese rainforest that casts a large shadow- the first question a patient is asked is: when was the last time you ate?

The goal is to open the doors to a new way of practicing medicine in the Congo and in the neighbouring countries. For instance, Monkole is one of the two hospitals in which blood can be donated, and one of the few that has a social worker that facilitates medical assistance to poor families. Currently, many other hospitals are emulating such improvements. Monkole is another example that change is possible, starts just now, and you are –or can be- part of it.

By icnet

Ten priorities for mentoring success

Xavier Bosch, CEO of ReachOut, one partner of  ICNET Network, shows the 10 priorities for a mentoring success project

As I see it, from the perspective which 30 years in business and 15 years as CEO of the ReachOut mentoring charity generates, mentoring is a good complement to parenting and schools; when parents find it increasingly difficult to relate to their children who seem to inhabit a different world from the one they grew up in, and teachers are so focused on academic skills that there is little time for developing the character values essential to achieving life’s goals.

So to anyone thinking of setting up a mentoring project I would say go for it, the impact you can have is huge. Here are a few tips to get you started.

1, Recruit top mentors

It may seem strange to start with the mentors rather than the project itself, but however much planning you put into your project, without good mentors it will not work, so it is worth spending a bit of time on this here (see points 2 to 5).

2, Get them on board.

One of the most important things to learn through mentoring is to give and this is taught primarily by example so I would recommend that mentors should be volunteers. Cast your net widely and advertise opportunities through university and local volunteering centres, online sites such as do-it.org and vinspired.com, and through company corporate social responsibility departments. Mentors from various walks of life will provide a broad range of experiences to the young people.

Provide a clear role description including tasks and activities involved, and the level of commitment and training required. Be clear and upfront to prevent volunteers signing up then dropping out later because they were looking for something different.

3, Train them well

Training should cover building a mentoring relationship, dealing with sensitive subjects and ending the relationship. It should offer a basic grounding in child psychology and development.

Mentors should be encouraged to work towards developing positive habits rather than avoiding negative ones and to look out for things to praise rather than criticise. Show the mentors how to relate to young people, not because they speak or dress like them but because they care for them and take a genuine interest in what their mentee tells them. Finally, training should also cover important aspects like safeguarding and maintaining boundaries.

4, Facilitate delivery

A plan for every session should be supplied in advance to allow the mentors to prepare and should offer activities with clear objectives, such as the growing in understanding of a character value such as self-control, or improving a hard skill like the grid method for multiplication. Often, the mentor and mentee may go off on a tangent which may be worth pursuing. Empower mentors to decide whether to go back to the activity or stick to the off-piste chat.

5, Offer on-going support

Hold regular feedback sessions to see how mentors are getting on and let them know who to contact if they have a specific issue that they want to discuss. Be there to listen to them and offer advice or possible solutions. Remember to check back later to see how they are getting on.

6, Work together

Mentoring is not a quick fix. It takes time to first build a relationship with a young person, find out where their needs lie and then figure out a way to support those needs. By working with staff at schools, parents or referring organisations you can give yourself a head start in understanding the young people, and find out what’s going on away from the mentoring project.

A teacher may be able to tell you that Jane is too shy to join in group activities but loves sport, Graham finds it difficult to express himself but is fantastic at art or that Charmaine can be very disruptive but responds well when time is taken to explain things one-to-one.

Mum can tell you if Gran has been ill lately, or if the young person was bullied in their previous school.

Ask the referring party or parent to complete a registration form for the child including any relevant background information and reasons for referral.

Talk with other influential people in the mentees’ lives whenever you can to share information and progress made, ensuring that all involved are working together to meet the needs of the young person.

7, Meet regularly

Best results are achieved in mentoring projects of more than six months duration and with regular meetings to allow the mentor-mentee relationships to develop and for change to happen.

8, Listen. Watch. Respond

Tune in to the interests and personalities of the young people in the group.

Listen to what they tell you. Does Timmy perk up when talking about football? Does Janna avoid talking about family life? Is Joshua comfortable asking for help or more prone to giving up without trying?

Watch how they behave. Who nominates themselves for team captain? Who walks around the room during maths but concentrates well during English? Who do they look up to?

Store up everything you learn and plan your sessions accordingly. Bear in mind what they enjoy and where they could develop so as to deliver the most effective activities for the group. Every young person and every group is different, so be flexible with your plans to give them what they need.

Review the progress of the mentees and make a note of any that need a follow-up. It might be that you need to discuss on-going needs with their teacher or a parent, or perhaps they will need to be referred to another organisation at the end of the project.

9, Keep it clear, keep it open

It is important that everyone knows where they stand. Take time to explain to the young people, mentors, teachers and parents the aims of the project, what is expected from them, and what they can hope to gain.

This way everyone knows what they are investing their time, effort and emotion in.

So, before the start make sure you explain the purpose of the project and run through the main activities, getting input from the young people about what they would like to do. Then take some time to manage expectations, for example do they have to attend every session? What can they discuss with their mentor? What activities are optional?

Have a defined project timeframe so that there is a clear and clean ending to the mentor-mentee relationship and at the end of the project let the young people know where they can turn if they need support. We tell them they can always get in touch with ReachOut for help if they need, or if they want to get in touch with their mentor in the future.

10, And finally…

I have always considered that learning to give is an important aspect of mentoring. No matter how untalented one is perceived to be, we can all give, even if it is a smile to a tired mate, or a “thank you” to the cleaning lady.

A good mentor will help their mentee find opportunities to give: to share food with a friend at lunch, help clear the table at home, support a friend who is struggling in class.

The possibilities are endless but each one enables the young person to appreciate the beauty of giving and the empowering effect it has. Eventually, as they grow and mature, mentees can start to mentor. This represents the end of the cycle but the beginning of a new adventure for the new mentor.

– See more at: http://www.sec-ed.co.uk/best-practice/ten-priorities-for-mentoring-success/#sthash.uv6UG7i4.dpuf

By icnet

Training seassons

Fecha de inicio: Durante las primeras semanas de septiembre Numero de participantes: entre 175 y 225 mentores A quien va dirigido: Va dirigido a todos los jóvenes que quieran realizar voluntariado con ReachOut!, y es de asistencia obligatoria Edades: Mayores de 18 Fecha de finalización: Finales de septiembre Lugar de realización: Oficina central de ReachOut!

Descripción del proyecto

ReachOut! Training Mentor trata de dar a los mentores las habilidades y conocimientos que son necesarios para apoyar, inspirar y motivar con éxito a los jóvenes que están trabajando por hacer cambios positivos. El Training proporcionara a los mentores voluntarios:

Conocimientos detallados sobre ReachOut! Sus fines y objetivos. Esto proporciona a los mentores información acerca de lo que significa ser un mentor con ReachOut! y las áreas de enfoque.

Conocimientos tanto de su proyecto, como de las actividades y objetivos específicos. Los mentores conocerán los detalles específicos acerca de las escuelas a las que van a trabajar, el rango de edad de los jóvenes, y las actividades que serán organizadas por los responsables del proyecto para ayudar a facilitar el proceso de tutoría.

Una serie de teorías sobre la tutoría y cómo estas teorías pueden guiar el trabajo con un joven. Proporciona a los mentores una comprensión de por qué estos jóvenes pueden necesitar el apoyo de un mentor y algunas pruebas para mostrar cómo su apoyo beneficiará a los jóvenes.

Habilidades clave prácticos para la comunicación, las relaciones de grupo y la creación de confianza. Da a los mentores una serie de herramientas y estrategias que pueda usar durante la tutoría. Formación sobre la protección de la infancia. Información en profundidad y asesoramiento sobre su papel en relación con las cuestiones de protección infantil.

La formación se divide en dos sesiones que todos los mentores deben completar. Las sesiones se han incorporado en el horario de tutoría para que sean de fácil acceso y que todos los mentores puedan asistir.

By icnet

BROSNA Leadership & Adventure Camp

The West of Ireland Leadership & Adventure Camp is a bilateral exchange that brought together 30 youths from Ireland and Germany for an 8-days residential camp in Ballyglunin Park Conference Centre, Co. Galway, Ireland. The objectives of the project were to help develop leadership skills, to promote healthy lifestyles, to foster mutual understanding between the participants and to learn from each other’s cultures.

To achieve all this, the participants attended leadership and team-building workshops in the morning where they discussed concepts and principles derived from the “7 habits for Highly Effective Teens” method developed by S. Covey. In the afternoons they were able to apply those principles to real-life scenarios of leadership and challenging adventures, taking part in individual and team activities such as caving, military combat games, sports competitions, cycling expeditions, cultural quizzes, talent shows, presentations about each other’s cultures.

An evaluation process at the start and end of the project assessed the quality of the learning achieved by the participants during the Camp, which was reflected on the YouthPass certificates issued for each one of them. The project received a grant from the EU Youth-in-Action programme.

Camp is a bilateral exchange that brought together 30 youths from Ireland and Germany for an 8-days residential camp in Ballyglunin Park Conference Centre, Co. Galway, Ireland. The objectives of the project were to help develop leadership skills, to promote healthy lifestyles, to foster mutual understanding between the participants and to learn from each other’s cultures.

To achieve all this, the participants attended leadership and team-building workshops in the morning where they discussed concepts and principles derived from the “7 habits for Highly Effective Teens” method developed by S. Covey. In the afternoons they were able to apply those principles to real-life scenarios of leadership and challenging adventures, taking part in individual and team activities such as caving, military combat games, sports competitions, cycling expeditions, cultural quizzes, talent shows, presentations about each other’s cultures.

An evaluation process at the start and end of the project assessed the quality of the learning achieved by the participants during the Camp, which was reflected on the YouthPass certificates issued for each one of them. The project received a grant from the EU Youth-in-Action programme. The main objectives of the Project were to develop leadership and teamwork skills, while also improve on our physical well-being. We also hoped to learn more about each other’s cultures and to discover new ways of developing good citizenship habits by learning from each other. To achieve these objectives we had informal workshops for one hour in the mornings to discuss leadership traits. We learnt about being pro-active, stepping outside our comfort zones, setting goals, listening empathically, appreciating and valuing differences, and balancing the many aspects of life.

We also had shorter discussion sessions (30-40 min) on some aspect of citizenship: solidarity & generosity, courage & daring, honesty & integrity, loyalty & respect. These sessions were led by one of the older participants but everyone was encouraged to contribute. In the afternoons we engaged in challenging outdoor activities that enabled us to put some of these life skills into action: gorge-walking & caving (to overcome our fears and step outside the comfort zone), climbed the emblematic mountain Croagh Patrick (to develop endurance and resilience , cycled around the Aran Island of Inishmor, played various team sports (tag-rugby, volleyball, rounders and soccer), some of which were unknown to the German participants, and we played a military game with laser guns.

In the evenings we had cultural activities: a quiz with questions about European affairs, its history and geography; an inspiring movie about some people escaping from a Soviet concentration camp across Siberia and China; a fireworks display; and a talent show on the last night.

By icnet

Arranca ‘Una Sonrisa por Navidad’ en 17 ciudades españolas

Con la llegada de las fiestas navideñas, en Cooperación Internacional ONG ponemos en marcha la tradicional campaña de voluntariado “Una Sonrisa por Navidad”.

A partir del 5 de diciembre, Día Internacional de los Voluntarios y hasta el 15 de enero, más de 1.000 jóvenes se implicarán en unas 200 iniciativas solidarias en 17 ciudades españolas: Ciudad Real, Toledo, Madrid, Granada, A Coruña, Oviedo, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Ferrol, Salamanca, Santander, Sevilla, Zaragoza, Murcia, Alicante, Valencia, Valladolid y Vigo.

Se trata de una iniciativa solidaria que pretende sensibilizar a la opinión pública a través de los medios de comunicación, sobre las necesidades reales que afectan a muchas personas. Este proyecto comprende acciones diversas como el reparto de juguetes, alimentos, la realización de eventos solidarios en beneficio de colectivos en riesgo de exclusión social, actividades de animación sociocultural en hospitales, acompañamiento de mayores y personas con discapacidad, entre muchas otras. Además, este año se acusan unas necesidades especiales dadas las circunstancias sociales y económicas que vivimos y las donaciones de alimentos para familias con escasos recursos de nuestro país constituyen un objetivo central dentro de esta campaña.

Esta Navidad todos podemos sentirnos un poco más solidarios: a través de donaciones en especie que pueden llevar a cabo las empresas; la ayuda que brindan los particulares que colaboran a modo individual; el tiempo que dedican los voluntarios y voluntarias que se implican… Gracias a iniciativas como ésta, conseguimos involucrar a las personas en la realidad social que nos afecta y hacemos que tomen parte activa en su transformación. “Una Sonrisa por Navidad” nos enseña que a través de la acción de dar a otros, recibimos mucho más de lo que ofrecemos.

By icnet

European Voluntary Service (EVS) Evaluation Meeting- 24th November 2012

On the 24th of November, a group of 30 youngsters who have participated in EVS during 2012, gathered in Oeiras in order to evaluate their EVS experience and share their learning outcomes with other volunteers, EVS Sending Coordinators and the Portuguese National Agency of the Youth in Action Programme.

These youngsters went to different parts of the world, lived in communities with very different cultures, integrated various Organizations and developed projects and activities as volunteers.

All volunteers recognized EVS as a great learning experience and that all the positive and less positive experiences that they have been through, have made them.

Understand the others as well as themselves better. In general, there is a great recognition of the social and personal skills that these experiences allow volunteers to develop and that is why they recommend this international action to all youngsters.

By icnet

Summer programe

Fecha de inicio: 30 de julio de 2012 Numero de participantes: 260 niños y niñas Escuelas implicadas: Our Laidies, Charlton, St. Paoul Edades: Mentee (participantes del programa): 9 a 14 años de edad Junior Mentors (Estudiantes): 14 a 18 años de edad Fecha de finalización: 24 de agosto de 2012 Numero de participantes: 260 niños y niñas Escuelas implicadas: Our Laidies, Charlton, St. Paoul

Descripción del proyecto

El Summer Programme ofrece a los jóvenes de entre 9-14 apoyo académico, actividades educativas y mucha diversión durante las vacaciones de verano. Se llevan a cabo con la ayuda de nuestros voluntarios, incluyendo a los jóvenes de nuestro Programa de JUNIOR MENTORS.

El proyecto se ejecuta diariamente durante 2-4 semanas en agosto en varias escuelas en Manchester. Los jóvenes tienen acceso a clases de refuerzo diarias en Matemáticas, Inglés y Ciencias, seguido de actividades educativas como el deporte, la danza, el arte y teatro.

El proyecto se lleva a cabo en tres escuelas de la periferia de Manchester:

  • Our Ladies: 120 participantes
  • Charlton: 60 participantes
  • St Paoul: 80 participantes
Monkole hospital, in Kinshasa, a benchmark in Medicine for Africa
Ten priorities for mentoring success
Training seassons
BROSNA Leadership & Adventure Camp
Arranca ‘Una Sonrisa por Navidad’ en 17 ciudades españolas
European Voluntary Service (EVS) Evaluation Meeting- 24th November 2012
Summer programe